Legal Value mapping

Abstract

It is often argued, not in the least by lawyers, that their work is not prone to automation. It is a work based on technique, expertise and know-how. Such traits require years of training and practice. It certainly does not lend itself to automation, digitalization[1] or virtualization[2]. In this article and live session, this topic is further explored.

[1] Digital innovation has three key characteristics: (i) re-programmability, allowing a wide array of functions, (ii) homogenization of data; separating the content from the medium and (iii) its self-referential nature, creating positive network externalities, reinforcing the digital innovation (Yoo, Henfridsson and Lyytinen, 2010, as explained in “THE LEGAL DISRUPTION DILEMMA”, Legal Market Insights, Corveleyn F, 2016)).

[2] Virtualization, is in essence the digital online (full or partial) translation of what are currently mostly physical processes. When virtualizing processes and services, a set of key questions should be reviewed: (i) How should virtual processes be designed; (ii) how will people use these virtual processes and (iii) what will be the consequences of this virtualization (Overby E, Slaughter S.A. and Konsynski B., 2010, as explained in “THE LEGAL DISRUPTION DILEMMA”, Legal Market Insights, Corveleyn F, 2016).

EDHEC

The EDHEC Augmented Law Institute

A great thanks goes out to Christophe Roquilly, Professor of Law, Director of the EDHEC Augmented Law Institute and Jérôme Frittera-Mogli, Research associate, LegalEDHEC research centre for this wonderful opportunity.

EDHEC 2